SAMRO

SAMRO

SAMRO

(South Africa) | http://www.samro.org.za

SAMRO’s primary role is to administer Performing Rights on behalf of our members. We do so by licensing music users (such as television and radio broadcasters, live music venues, retailers, restaurants, promoters and shopping centres), through the collection of licence fees which are then distributed as royalties.

PROFILE

Since 1961, SAMRO has been South Africa’s music rights champion. We protect the rights of composers and authors (music creators) both locally and internationally. Collecting licence fees from music users – television broadcasters, radio stations, in-store radio stations, pubs, clubs, retailers, restaurants and all other businesses that broadcast, use or play music.

SAMRO also plays a vital role in funding and supporting music and arts education through the SAMRO Foundation. It also boosts the local music industry by hosting regular seminars and workshops, and supporting conferences such as MOSHITO, to help foster and develop creativity across all categories and genres of music.

SAMRO is committed to being a world-class African copyright administration business that upholds the highest standards of corporate governance, business ethics and management in its quest to make a valuable and lasting contribution to the lives of its members, to South African cultural heritage, and to the music industry in general.

OUR STORY

SAMRO was established in 1961 under the stewardship of Dr Gideon Roos Senior, to protect the intellectual property of composers and authors and to ensure that their creative output is adequately accredited and compensated both locally and internationally.

Today, SAMRO has grown into an internationally recognised collecting administration business representing more than 15 000 music creators. It has built up a solid reputation as the primary representative of music Performing Rights in Southern Africa, and is well respected among its global peers in the music industry.

OUR PURPOSE

  • To create value for the creators and users of music;
  • To protect the intellectual property rights of writers, composers and music publishers by licensing music users;
  • To ensure that members whose works are broadcast and played commercially are paid their royalties from licence fees collected by SAMRO; and to actively promote the value of copyright.